Eye loss a warning to us all

By Pete Richardson

Eye loss a warning to us all

The Ryder Cup in Paris was a glorious event for millions of sports fans.

But for one lady it has had a dramatic and life-changing effect when she lost sight permanently in one eye after being hit by an errant drive.

Corine Remande, 49, is now considering legal action against the tournament organisers after claiming there had been no shouted warning as Brooks Koepka’s drive headlined towards the crowd.

 She said:  “Doctors told me I had lost the use of that eye.”

“It happened so fast, I didn’t feel any pain when I was hit. I didn’t feel like the ball had struck my eye and then I felt the blood start to pour. The scan on Friday confirmed a fracture of the right eye-socket and an explosion of the eyeball.”

Koepka was quick to make his way over to the crowd and apologise to Remande, who was later treated at an eye hospital in Paris.

But an apology may well not be enough.

Remande said: “Quite clearly, there is responsibility on the part of the organisers,”

“Officials did not shout any warning as the player’s ball went into the crowd. More than anything I want them to take care of all the medical bills to make sure there is no risk of infection.”

Remande, who had travelled from Egypt to attend the tournament, also criticised the tournament organisers for “not making contact” with her following the incident.

The tragic incident raises several questions. Who is responsible for the safety of spectators at golf events? Who is responsible if a golfer hits another golfer on the course? Where does responsibility lie for golfers and others on golf courses, with the course or the owners or those taking part or watching?

Golf balls in flight are hazardous objects. I was always taught never to stand in-front of a golf ball being hit – although that’s rather difficult for 70,000 people at a Ryder Cup.

If you have a view on where responsibility lies and how to prevent legal action like this please do let us know.

And our sincerest best wishes go to Corine Remande for a speed recovery and resolution which helps compensate her in some way for the loss of her sight.