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Holes-in-one – The records

The H1 Club celebrates the ultimate golfing achievement for most golfers – a hole-in-one.

The H1 Club celebrates the ultimate golfing achievement for most golfers – a hole-in-one.

An Ace, the shot of your life.

But how many are there?

Who has the most, what’s the longest, has anyone aced a par 5, who was the youngest or oldest to have one?

Here we look at the records across the glob of the most amazing hole-in-one statistics.

You may be surprised to know the odds for an amateur golfer of acing a hole have been calculated at 25,000/1 – for a professional it drops to 25,000/1.

So, it’s some achievement and celebrated in style whenever it occurs – often with a round of drinks in the clubhouse.

There have been some amazingly memorable holes-in-one including in the 1973 Open Championship when, Gene Sarazen aged 71, made a hole in one.

Earl Dietering of Memphis, Tennessee, who was 78-years-old at the time, is believed to hold the record for the eldest person to make a hole-in-one twice during one round. Yes – you read it right – twice in one round at the age of 78. Jealous are we?

Two in one round is OK – but how about back-to-back holes in one? Has that ever happened?

During the second round of the 1971 Martini International tournament, held at Royal Norwich Golf Club, England, John Hudson had two consecutive holes in one.

Teeing off, using a 4-iron, at the par-three, 195-yard 11th hole, Hudson holed his tee shot.

At the next hole, the downhill 311-yard, par-four 12th, and this time using a driver, he once again holed his tee shot, for another ace.

This is believed to be the only time a player has scored holes-in-one at consecutive holes in a major professional tournament.

On August 11, 2016, Justin Rose shot a hole in one during the first round of the golf tournament of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, which is considered to be the first in Olympic history. For the 189 yards 3-par hole, he used a 7-iron and he went on to win the gold medal.

Have there ever been holes-in-one on a par 5?

Well of course there have – but in the history of the game a condour – the name of an ace on a par 5 – has been recorded just four times.

The first occurred in 1962, when Larry Bruce drove into the hole over a clump of trees on the 480-yard dogleg right par-5 fifth hole at Hope Country Club in Arkansas, USA.

Another condor was achieved by cutting the corner of a dogleg par-5 by Shaun Lynch at Teign Valley Golf Club in Devon, England, in 1995, on the 496-yard 17th. Lynch aimed straight at the green with a 3-iron, clearing a 20-foot-high hedge and hitting a downslope on the other side, which allowed his ball to roll down to the green and into the hole.

A condor was scored without cutting over a dogleg by Mike Crean at Green Valley Ranch Golf Club in Denver, Colorado, in 2002, when he holed his drive at the 517-yard par-5 9th. This is longest hole in one on record, although it was helped by the altitude and thin air of the course they call 'mile-high' Denver.

In Australia 16-year-old Jack Bartlett aced on the 467-metre par-5 17th at Royal Wentworth Falls Country Club, NSW, Australia, on November 3, 2007.

In the history of the PGA Tour in the USA, there has been only one hole-in-one to date on a par-4 hole. It happened at TPC Scottsdale, home of the Phoenix Open (then called the FBR Open). And it was made by Andrew Magee – and was not your average hole-in-one.

Magee, just an average driver of the ball, didn't think he'd be able to reach the green on the hole, which that day measured 332 yards from tee to green. So, he didn't wait for the group ahead to clear the green and let loose with the driver.

The ball ran up onto the green while the group of Steve Pate, Gary Nicklaus (yes, Jack Nicklaus' son) and Tom Byrum were still putting. Magee's ball bounded onto the green where Byrum was squatting down studying the line of his putt.

Magee's ball ran between Byrum's feet and struck Byrum's putter. The ball ricocheted off Byrum's putter and dropped right into the cup.

In 2013, Jason Kokrak aced a 409-yard, par-4 hole at the PGA Tour's McGladrey Classic—but not in the tournament itself, but in the pro-am that preceded the tournament.

At the 2015 Valero Texas Open, Aaron Baddeley did hole-out with driver from the tee on the par-4 17th hole. Ace, right? No! It was Baddeley's second drive on the hole. He hit his first one out of bounds. So that hole-out with the second drive gave him a score of 3 on the hole.

On ladies tour in the US the first par-4 ace happened in 2016 at the Pure Silk Bahamas LPGA Classic, the eighth hole typically played 310 yards.

But tournament organizers moved the tees way up one day so golfers could fire at the par-4 green. And they did, given that the hole played only 218 yards. And Ha Na Jang rolled her drive into the cup.

It took around 65 years for the first LPGA par-4 ace, but only a couple months for the second. Two months later, at the 2016 Kia Classic, Minjee Lee aced the 276-yard par-4 16th hole.

The first par-4 ace on the Japan Tour happened in 1978. Tommy Nakajima holed-out his drive on the 341-yard, No. 1 hole in The Crowns tournament during the second round.

The first on the Web.com Tour was Chip Beck's in the 2003 Omaha Classic, on the 315-yard No. 9 hole during the first round.

The first on the European Tour was Javier Colomo's on the 329-yard No. 9 hole during the 2015 AfrAsia Bank Mauritius Open.

The first on the European Senior Tour was Guillermo Encina's in the 2003 Tunisian Seniors Open, on the 354-yard, No. 11 hole during the second round.

But what about us mere mortals?

Six-year-old Jack Dunn holed the par-3 134-yard to write himself into the history books of the Bruntsfield Links Golfing Society, Edinburgh, the fourth oldest club in the world, as one of the youngest ever to hit an ace.

Not bad for a six-year-old.

But how about 4-year-old lucky/unlucky Harry Smith.

According to Golf Digest in the US, for a hole-in-one to count as a record, it needs to be made on a golf course measuring at least 6,000 yards. Smith's round at Brooklawn, in Conneticut, while a formidable test and a host of multiple USGA championship, was played from the club's U.S. Kids tees. His ace on the fifth hole, came from 84 yards, with the complete U.S. Kid layout measuring 3,335 yards, so it fell short of the standard required to be a record.

The same goes for Jake Paine, three years old, who holed out on the 66 yard 6th hole at Lake Forest Golf and Practice Course, California, in 2001.

According to Golf Digest the record is held by Keith Long of Saline, Michigan, who was 5 years, 148 days when he made his ace in Oct. 1998. Long's ace came on the 140-yard fourth hole at Michigan's Gracewil Pines Golf Course (now Pine Hollow Golf Club) which measures 6,020 yards.

While Guinness World Records say the youngest male golfer recorded to have shot a hole in one is Christian Carpenter of the USA who was aged 4 years and 195 days at the Mountain View Golf Club, Hickory, North Carolina, USA on December 18, 1999 when he made an ace. But they don’t describe the hole distance.

The youngest female golfer to score a hole-in-one is Soona Lee-Tolley from the USA, who was aged 5 years 103 days when she holed out at the par 3 7th at Manhattan Woods Golf Club, West Nyack, New York, USA, on 1 July 2007. The hole is a 125 yards long.

From the youngest to the oldest.

The oldest golfer, man or woman, known to have made a hole in one is Elsie McLean, aged 102 when, on April 5, 2007, she holed out with a driver on the 100-yard fourth hole at Bidwell Park, in Chico, California. It was her first ace.

The oldest man is Harold Stilson, from Boca Raton, Florida. He was 101 years old when he aced the 108 yard 16th hole with a four iron at the Deerfield Country Club on May 16, 2001. It was his sixth!

Legendary comedian Bob Hope achieved a hole in one at the age of 90 in Palm Springs.

Then there are some people who are just plain greedy.

The most holes-in-one in a single round of golf is 3, achieved by Patrick Wills, another American, at the Laurel Hill Golf Club in Lorton, Virginia, USA on 22 June 2015 in the Summer Solstice Tournament.

Hi feat was almost matched by Ali Gibb – our very own H1 Club superstar.

The 51-year-old six-handicap, defending her 36-hole club championship title at Croham Hurst in Surrey, England, holed out from the tee three times in the space of just 25 holes.

She had had three holes-in-one in 42 years, then another three in five hours.

Two of her aces came on the same hole – the 5th – with the final coming on her second visit to the 160-yard 11th.

As well as cementing her place in club golf history books, Ali went on to defend her title with a score of 163.

Norman Manley, of California, holds the record for most hole in ones with 59. Manley shot his first hole in one in 1964 and aced four holes in 1979.

Compared to the amazingly lucky Norman Manley how many aces have the most “famous” golfers had?

Phil Mickelson has five on the PGA Tour. Other notables are Jack Nicklaus and Tiger Woods with three and Arnold Palmer two.

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